Family

Farly Crest
Farley Family Crest

Farly Crest
Another Family Crest

Farly Family History
Farley Family History

Oliver Cromwell
Oliver Cromwell

Charles II
Charles II

Lynch House, Galway
Lynch House, Galway

View of St. Nicholas Church, Galway
View of St. Nicholas Church, Galway

Farley Origins

The Farley surname dates back to Normany, France. Walter de Falaise (1014) left France and moved to England. The current spelling came about in the year 1200. Over the years the Farleys moved on, some to Scotland, others to Ireland, and others to the New World.

The Farleys who settled in England became part of the Anglo-Norman aristocracy. The Anglo-Normans were Catholic and during the War of the Roses (1455-1487) many emigrated to Ireland, particularly County Meath.

The Farleys also settled in County Antrim, Dublin, and County Cork. It would have been from there that the Farleys emigrated to Galway.

The Goreys (variation: Gorry) settled in County Kildare and County Kilkenny. The Goreys married into the Farley family.

During the time of Oliver Cromwell, and the parliamentary government (1599-1658), Galway suffered considerably. All Catholics were expelled from the town during these years, and the great townhouses of the 14 founding families of Galway were confiscated and given to soldiers of the occupying forces in lieu of pay. They quickly fell into ruin as the prosperity of the town declined. The parliamentary government confiscated 11 million acres of land from the Catholics. Twenty percent of the land was left to the Catholics, the worst land in Ireland. This led to a Protestant ascendency.

Old Galway Town

After the Restoration of Charles II in 1660, Galway looked to recover its former position of wealth. Later, the war between William of Orange (Protestant) and James II (Catholic), Charles' brother, brought the economic recovery to an end. Under the 1704 Penal Laws, which at first were rigorously enforced, Catholics suffered severely in relation to education, ownership of property and civil rights. Savage laws were passed against the Catholics. Their lands were confiscated in full, they weren't allowed to own land or hold office, they couldn't practice law, they weren't allowed an education, and they could not bear arms. Many Catholics left Ireland for the New World during these years.

Farly History
Farly History

Galway was constructed in 1124 by the King of Connacht. Galway lay in the túath of Clann Fhergail, which covered the parishes of St. Nicholas (the medieval city), Roscam and part of Baile an Chláir/Claregalway parish. The district was held by the Ó hAllmhuráin (O'Halloran) clan until the Norman invasion of Connacht in the 1230s. This may be when the first Farleys arrived in the area from Normandy, via England.

Galway thrived under the de Burghs in the 1200's, and became a small walled town. In the late 1300's and early 1400's the English-oriented merchant families were anxious to have control over their own affairs and became independent of the de Burghs. After achieving independence, Galway became culturally and politically isolated from the surrounding Gaelic and Gaelic-Norman territories.

Old Galway
Old Galway

  

Farly Origins

John Farley and Marie Ann Gorri

Antoine Farly and Marie Ann Basquin

Jacques Philippes Farly and Josephte Dumouchel

Albert Farly and Marie-Joseph Desery-Latour

Pierre Albert Farly and Marie-Celeste Masson

Francois Xavier Farly and Emelie Denomme

Amable Farly and Marie Forcier

Denise Farly and Julius Boucher

Adam Farly and Valerie Alard

Julia Farly and Joseph Boucher