Family

Quebec Farmhouse 1755
Quebec Farmhouse - 1755

Ste Barthelemy Scenery
Ste Barthelemy Scenery

Ste Barthelemy
Ste Barthelemy

Ste Barthelemy Train
Ste Barthelemy Train

Peaceful Scenery at Ste Barthelemy
Peaceful Scenery at Ste Barthelemy

Colourful Barn at Ste Barthelemy
Colourful Barn at Ste Barthelemy

Church at Ste Barthelemy
Church at Ste Barthelemy

Ste Barthelemy Rainbow
Ste Barthelemy Rainbow

Ste Barthelemy Roadsign
Ste Barthelemy Roadsign

Ste Barthelemy - Fishing on the St. Lawrence River
Ste Barthelemy - Fishing on the St. Lawrence River

Ste Barthelemy Scenery
Ste Barthelemy

François Xavier Farly and Emilie Denomme

François Xavier was born in 1808, probably at L'Ile-Dupas, Quebec, near Montreal. His parents, Pierre Albert Farly and Marie-Celeste Masson lived there for most of their lives. François Xavier had 7 sisters and brothers, Genevieve, Albert Oliviere, Adelaide, Hyacinthe, Genevieve, Pierre, Joseph and Isidore. His mother died in 1823, and his father remarried Elizabeth Coitou St. Jean, and François Xavier gained an additional 6 half siblings, Zoe, Pierre Albert, Leon, Lucie, Olive, and Isidore.

François Xavier's father was a farmer. Wheat was the main crop raised, as well as livestock, such as chickens, cows, pigs, and perhaps geese. François Xavier was 4 when the War of 1812 broke out, so he grew up amid the conflict that followed for many years. Francois was 29 years old when the French Canadian Patriotes were holding mass protest rallies and civil disobedience against the British, but they didn't stand a chance, and the result was British retaliation, consisting of widespread looting and burning of French Canadian settlements. The Patriots managed to set off a mass uprising of the habitants in which Francois Xavier may have been involved. In any event, his life would have been affected by the political happenings of the time. The French Canadians were beaten again, and there is still tension today between the French and English Quebecois.

François Xavier married Emélie Denommé on October 5, 1838. His profession is listed as blacksmith on his marriage certificate. He had been married previously, because he is also listed as the widower of Adélaide Dupuis of St. Barthelemy. Emélie's parents were Charles Denommé and Elizabeth Savignac, who lived at St. Barthelemy.

To see a copy of their marriage record, see François Xavier and Emélie.

For a typed version and translation, see François Xavier and Emélie. I translated this so there may be some words not translated exactly.

In 1849, the Parliament of Canada passed the Rebellion Losses Bill which compensated people who suffered property losses during the Rebellions of 1837 in Lower Canada. The bill compensated everyone, including the rebels, and as a result protestors caused a riot that forced the military to step in. A fire was started and the Parliament of Canada buildings in Montreal were burned down.

François and Emélie were listed in the 1851 Quebec Census, and one of their children listed in the census was Julie Farly (born 1838). As she was born the same year as François Xavier and Emélie were married, it is likely that she was the child of Adélaide Dupuis, who probably died in childbirth. Men at that time remarried quickly because they could not raise or care for their children on their own, especially a newborn baby. The other children were Emélie Farly (born 1839 at St-Barthélemy), François Xavier Farly (1844), Adelme Farly, Louis (1847), and Olivine (1850). According to the 1861 Quebec Census, François Farly was a farmer. Perhaps his main profession was farming and he did blacksmithing to earn extra income. Adam's older brother, François, became a doctor, and lived in Crookston, Minnesota. His younger brother, Oliver, lived in the family home in Quebec.

According to the 1851 Census, the population of Canada West was numerically superior to that of Canada East. Politicians began to discuss representation by population. In 1854, the seigneurial system of land tenancy was abolished in Canada East but its effects lingered for another hundred years.

In the 1871 Census of Canada, François and Emélie were listed on the census. Another family listed just above François and Emélie were Charles and Josette Denomme. Emélie's father's name was Charles. Emélie's mother's name was Elizabeth Savignac so either she was called Josette as a nickname or this was Charles' second wife.

1871 Census
1871 Census

In the 1881 Census of Canada, François was listed as Francis Farly, age 73, and Emélie Denomme, age 63 and Wilfrid Farly, age 14, living at St Barthélemi, Quebec. Wilfred Farly is listed as a son. As he is only 14, and Emelie is 63, she would have been 49 when he was born.

1881 Census
1881 Census

Francois Farley
François Farley

To download the 1881 Census of Canada page for François Farly, click here. You will notice that there is another Farly family immediately following.


François Xavier Farly

     

Farly Origins

John Farley and Marie Ann Gorri

Antoine Farly and Marie Ann Basquin

Jacques Philippes Farly and Josephte Dumouchel

Albert Farly and Marie-Joseph Desery-Latour

Pierre Albert Farly and Marie-Celeste Masson

Francois Xavier Farly and Emelie Denomme

Amable Farly and Marie Forcier

Denise Farly and Julius Boucher

Adam Farly and Valerie Alard

Julia Farly and Joseph Boucher